News

Stevie Ray Vaughan & Jeff Beck At Cobo Arena In 1989

The Oakland Press has taken a look back at Stevie Ray Vaughan’s and Jeff Beck’s Fire Meets The Fury Tour at Detroit’s Cobo Arena on November 3, 1989. Photographer Ken Settle writes:

“Just when you thought that back and forth between artist and audience couldn’t get any stronger, Stevie, who was looking and playing like a guy who had been transported to another dimension, grabbed a whole fistful of notes, and bent them all up about two steps, the light man hit the neck of his Stratocaster with an intense bright spotlight right at that moment, and the audience just roared. That was one of the most powerful musical moments of my career, for certain.”

Read more and view photos at The Oakland Press.

SRV Remembered By Those Who Knew Him Best – The New York Times

The first time that Buddy Guy, quite possibly the greatest living blues guitarist, heard Stevie Ray Vaughan play, he couldn’t believe it. “He was hitting them notes and made me feel like I should go in the audience and watch so I could learn something,” says Guy in Alan Paul and Andy Aledort’s illuminating oral history, Texas Flood: The Inside Story of Stevie Ray Vaughan.

Read more at The New York Times.

Tommy Shannon Shares Photos Of SRV – Houston Chronicle

For the first time publicly, Stevie Ray Vaughan’s longtime bass player Tommy Shannon is sharing a portion of his personal photobook with the Houston Chronicle in an exclusive behind-the-scenes look at the late guitarist – including some gems like the time Vaughan was hanging with Robert Plant backstage.

View the photos and read more at Chron.com.

Jimmie Vaughan’s Epilogue From ‘Texas Flood’ Biography

From Jimmie Vaughan’s epilogue to Texas Flood: The Inside Story of Stevie Ray Vaughan:

“The guitar was Stevie’s instrument of liberation, his magic sword. I can’t even fathom Stevie without a guitar. It meant everything to him. It took Stevie around the world. It introduced him to his heroes. It allowed him to express himself so he could speak, so he could have an identity. So he could find out who he was. When Stevie played, his guitar talked and told his story. If you listen, you can hear it. You can hear him speaking through his guitar. I know I can.”